Top 10 Forts in India

Nahargarh Fort

One amongst the three fort constructed by the rulers of Jaipur, the Nahargarh Fort has its own significant place in history. Built by Sawai Raja Jai Singh in the year 1734 and located on the asperous Aravalli hills, the Nahargarh Fort was required to strengthen the protective coverage of Amber, the capital of the earlier rulers of Jaipur. Further extension and expansion work was done in the fort by later rulers and it is these additions that today hold the attention of the tourists. The original old structures have been hugely affected by the passage of time. Nahargarh Fort has an interesting anecdote attached to its construction. It is said that the fort was haunted by a spirit of a prince called Nahar. He made sure that an impediment occurred every time the construction of the fort progressed smoothly. Eventually, a tantrik prayed to the spirit of the prince who assented to leave only on the condition that the fort was named after him. The Fort, which is also known as the Tiger Fort, is reached by a walk past the streets at the base followed by a 2 km trek up the towering hill. On the top of the hill, the beautiful Man Sagar Lake spreads a welcoming glance. Right in the middle of the lake, Raja Jai Singh II built a duck blind, a shelter for screening duck hunters, for his shooting parties.

History

Nahargarh Fort of Rajasthan is located on the sheer rugged ridge of Aravali Hills and it forms an impressive northern backdrop of Pink City of Jaipur, the capital city of Indian state of Rajasthan. Nahargarh Fort of Rajasthan is the first of the three forts built by Maharaja Jai Sawai Singh of Jaipur in Rajasthan. Beyond the hills of Jaigarh, stands the fort of Nahargarh like a watchful sentinel guarding Sawai Jai Singh's beautiful capital. The Fort of Rajasthan was constructed mainly in 1734, however further additions were made to it, by the succeeding rulers in the 19th century. In 1734, seven years after his new capital was built Jai Singh II began to build this small fort. Two and a half centuries later it still stands tall on a steep rocky face with massive walls and bastions for company. Jai Singh II named it Sudarshangarh (sudarshan chakra: Lord Vishnu’s discus; garh: fort). Along with Amber Fort of Rajasthan and Jaigarh Fort of Rajasthan it formed a strong defence ring for the city. During the Sepoy revolt of 1857, Nahagarh served as a refuge for Europeans fleeing from the havoc created by mutineers in neighboring states. The term "Nahargarh" refers to "the Abode of Tigers", so it is also known as the Tiger Fort of Rajasthan. It overlooks the city from a sheer ridge to the north, and is floodlit at night. Much of the original structures are now in ruins, but the lovely buildings added by Sawai Ram Singh II and Sawai Madho Singh II in the 19 th century are preserved in a good condition and remind the visitors of the glory of the former age that belonged to kings and Maharajas. This Place was used as a picnic spot for the members of the Royal family.

Architecture

In 1734, seven years after his new capital was built Jai Singh II began to build this small fort. Two and a half-centuries later it still stands tall on a steep rocky face with massive walls and bastions for company. The fort provides an excellent view of the Pink City spread out at its foot. Jai Singh II named it Sudarshangarh (sudarshan chakra: Lord Vishnu’s discus; garh: fort).



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